About SBN FAQs Contact Us Blog Book an AxIT Discovery Session Login

The Relationship Between Maximal Jump-Squat Power and Sprint Acceleration in Athletes

research Mar 09, 2019

Thirty male athletes [height: 183.8 (6.8) cm, and mass: 90.6 (9.3) kg; mean (SD)] each completed six 10-m sprints from a standing start. Sprint times were recorded using a tethered running system and the force-time characteristics of the first ground contact were recorded using a recessed force plate. Three to six days later subjects completed three concentric jump squats, using a traditional and split technique, at a range of external loads from 30–70% of one repetition maximum (1RM)

Average power was maximal at all loads between 30% and 60% of 1RM for both squats. Split squat peak power was also maximal between 30% and 60% of 1RM; however, traditional squat peak power was maximal between 50% and 70% of 1RM. Concentric force development is critical to sprint start performance and accordingly maximal concentric jump power is related to sprint acceleration.

Close

50% Complete

Two Step

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua.